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Language Information

Tatar, also spelled Tartar, is spoken both in European Russia and in Siberia. Its 5 million speakers are divided into a number of branches, the most important being the Volga Tatars, who inhabit the lands drained by the Volga River and its tributaries The greatest concentrations of Volga Tatars are in the Republic of Tatarstan (capital: Kazan), where they number about 2 million, and in the Bashkorstan (capital: Ufa), where they number about one million. A second branch of the Tatars consists of the Siberian Tatars, who number about 100,000 and live in western Siberia.

Tatar is a Turkic language belonging to the Altaic family. The Tatars first appear in Russian history in the 13th century when, as the Mongols, they overran most of the country and settled down to rule. The new state was known as the Golden Horde, with its capital at Sarai, near the modern city of Astrakhan. But its distance from the capital of the Mongol Empire, coupled with the small number of governing Mongols in the Horde itself, led to its ultimate absorption by Turkic elements. When the Golden Horde began to crumble in the 15th century, a number of new Tatar kingdoms were formed-Kazan, Astrakhan, Crimean, and Siberian. These in turn fell to Russia a century later.

Originally written in the Arabic script, Tatar now uses the Cyrillic.


Tatar is spoken/used in the following countries:
Bashkortostan, Kazakhstan, Russia, Tatarstan.

Language Family
Family: Altaic
Subgroup: Tukic
Branch: Northwestern(Kipchak)

Copyright © Kenneth Katzner, The Languages of the World, Published by Routledge.

Writing Sample

Writing Sample


Wearing a shabby spring coat, country-style overshoes, and woolen stockings, Gazinur held Minnuri's hand in his, and looked into her dear eyes for the last time. Although the sleepless agonizing night had left a trace of sadness of her pretty face, she showed no signs of dispair or confusion. In her loving look there was no suggestion of the usual question in such situations: "What will I do without you, alone, with two small children? How will I live?" Only now, at the moment of saying goodbye, when Gazinur took Minnuri in his arms, did her long eyelashes begin to quiver.